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Hard Work Never Killed Anybody challenges the soul-destroying belief that hard work is essential for personal and national wellbeing
Hard Work Never Killed Anybody    Minimize
by John Bottomley

Hard Work Never Killed Anybody challenges the soul-destroying belief that hard work is essential for personal and national wellbeing.  Author John Bottomley has written a thought-provoking book questioning our belief that the absolutising of work should be the primary source of meaning for human life in western cultures.

Through historical data and experience gained during the author’s career supporting injured workers and bereaved families, Hard Work Never Killed Anybody will confront readers who are used to believing that work gives our lives worth. Is our system really identifying what causes work-related harm and death?

To what extent is our understanding of grief in general and work-related grief in particular limited by an ideology that hides work-related harm and death behind the ‘higher’ demands of hard work and economic progress? And how may grief practitioners learn to listen and respond to the depth of injustice suffered by all who are captive to this death-dealing mantra?

John was until recently director of Creative Ministries Network in Armadale (Melbourne) and is a Board member of the Yarra Institute for Religion and Social Policy.

Available for $29.95 from Morning Star Publishing, http://www.morningstarpublishing.net.au/
The morality of torture   Minimize

Photo courtesy pierre pouliquin, flickr. CC
Please click HERE to read more about Dr. Cal Ledsham's project on the morality of torture in the light of Christian social traditions.
Work-related deaths and the experience of their wi | Hard Work Never Killed Anybody | Refugee Resettlement | Health costs of extended mandatory detention | Torture Project | Young People, Faith and Social Justice | Kevin Mogg Memoirs: Vatican II and Catholic social | Church responses in natural disasters | Catholic Church and East Timor – Hilton Deakin | Christian Perspectives on Globalisation
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